Sprint Kickstarter Plan offers $15/month lines with Unlimited Data (with limitations) with New or Ported phone numbers

If you like unlimited data that is speed-limited, and you have phones that are compatible with the Sprint network, AND you are willing to start new lines and/or port existing phone numbers, Sprint has a pretty good deal, it’s the $15 per month Kickstarter promotion running until 6/14/18. This can be handy if you do a lot of smartphone photography out and about and want to instantly backup your photos to the cloud…

This offer is available online. You can buy a phone new or pre-owned from the Sprint website, or for a potentially better value, Bring your own phone, especially if you already own those phones or can get them for good prices used or refurbished. A growing number of phones are “all carrier” in the US market, including the bang-for-the-buck Motorola Moto G series, the Essential Phone, not just the iPhone, Galaxy and Pixel/Nexus flagships and the LG V30S. The aforelinked page has a detailed list of eligible phones under the “How do I know if my device is eligible” FAQ, or you can enter the IMEI in the box over there.

As usual, check the details, terms and conditions of the offer over there! Depending on which carrier(s) you have now, they may be doing some things different, so don’t assume it will be the same as your current carrier.

The data speed limits on the $15/month plans are as follows:
+ up to 480p video streaming
+ up to 500 Kbps in music streaming
+ up to 2 mbps in gaming streaming
+ excessive data use leads to deprioritation as with the regular Sprint plans
+ hotspot feature NOT available

Offers like this are a good reason to go for an “all carrier” phone that is carrier-unlocked. It gives you the ultimate flexibility. And it cuts down the number of options if you are dealing with “information overload” in trying to decide “which phone(s) to buy next” 🙂

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Comments

  1. S.W. Anderson says:

    Sprint would better serve potential customers by specifying ” at least” speeds or “typical” instead of “up to” speeds. In an earlier time I made a few trips on a commuter train that stopped in several towns. There were a few relatively brief stretches where that train got up to 60 mph or better. Most of the time it crawled up to 40 or so getting out of one town before slowing and stopping at another. Average speed on the approximately 65-mile trip couldn’t have been more than 35 mph at most.